Never-before-seen photos of the disastrous Gallipoli campaign have come to light over a century later after being salvaged from a tip.

The fascinating snaps were taken by a Sub Lieutenant Gilbert Speight who served in the Royal Naval Air Service in World War One.

They feature in his photo album which covers his eventful war, including a later stint in Egypt.

There are dramatic photos of the Allies landing at X Beach on the Gallipoli peninsula in modern day Turkey as well as sobering images of a mass funeral following the death of 17 British soldiers.

Another harrowing image shows bodies lined up in a mass grave. Other photos show ambulance workers, the trenches and captured Turkish prisoners.

The comprehensive photo album had been dumped at a refuse tip and would have been destroyed.

Luckily the vendor picked it up, flicked through it and realised its significance. Sadly little is known of Lt Speight but it is believed he survived the First World War.

GG Speight (left) was based as an RNAS Observer in Cornwall. Lt Speight travelled from Malta to Gallipoli in 1915 and was stationed there for the 11 month campaign against the Ottomans, which ran from February 1915 to January 1916

GG Speight (left) was based as an RNAS Observer in Cornwall. Lt Speight travelled from Malta to Gallipoli in 1915 and was stationed there for the 11 month campaign against the Ottomans, which ran from February 1915 to January 1916

The RNAS armoured car division was re-equipped and sent west to Mersa Matrouh where a Ottoman instigated uprising of the Senussi tribe had to be put down

The RNAS armoured car division was re-equipped and sent west to Mersa Matrouh where a Ottoman instigated uprising of the Senussi tribe had to be put down

The RNAS were equipped with lightly armoured cars mounted with a Vickers machine gun - state of the art weapons in 1916

The RNAS were equipped with lightly armoured cars mounted with a Vickers machine gun – state of the art weapons in 1916

The RNAS armoured car division was re-equipped and sent west to Mersa Matrouh where a Ottoman instigated uprising of the Senussi tribe was to be put down

The RNAS armoured car division was re-equipped and sent west to Mersa Matrouh where a Ottoman instigated uprising of the Senussi tribe was to be put down

This page in Mersa Matrouh shows rescued crew from a torpedoed steamer and Arab refugees arriving at the remote coastal fort

This page in Mersa Matrouh shows rescued crew from a torpedoed steamer and Arab refugees arriving at the remote coastal fort

Troops landing on X beach. The comprehensive photo album had been dumped at a refuse tip and would have been destroyed

Troops landing on X beach. The comprehensive photo album had been dumped at a refuse tip and would have been destroyed

The arrival of the RNAS in Gallipoli in April 1915. At the height of the fighting during the landings of April 25, 1915, the waters around the peninsula were stained red with blood at one point 150ft out

The arrival of the RNAS in Gallipoli in April 1915. At the height of the fighting during the landings of April 25, 1915, the waters around the peninsula were stained red with blood at one point 150ft out

A huge gun on Cape Helles and Speight poses in a shell hole near Gallipoli. Lt Speight travelled from Malta to Gallipoli in 1915 and was stationed there for the 11 month campaign against the Ottomans, which ran from February 1915 to January 1916

A huge gun on Cape Helles and Speight poses in a shell hole near Gallipoli. Lt Speight travelled from Malta to Gallipoli in 1915 and was stationed there for the 11 month campaign against the Ottomans, which ran from February 1915 to January 1916

The aftermath of a 3 day battle in January 1916 with the Senussi tribe. The album, which also shows troops during rare moments of relaxation away from the heat of battle, has emerged for sale with C & T Auctions, of Ashford, Kent. It is expected to fetch £1,500

The aftermath of a 3 day battle in January 1916 with the Senussi tribe. The album, which also shows troops during rare moments of relaxation away from the heat of battle, has emerged for sale with C & T Auctions, of Ashford, Kent. It is expected to fetch £1,500

This page shows the relieved RNAS survivors leaving Gallipoli after the unsuccessful campaign that cost Churchill his job at the Admiralty

This page shows the relieved RNAS survivors leaving Gallipoli after the unsuccessful campaign that cost Churchill his job at the Admiralty

It has since been consigned for auction with C&T Auctions, of Ashford, Kent. It is expected to fetch £1,500.

Tim Harper, specialist at C&T Auctions, said: ‘This is an outstanding photo album covering Gilbert Speight’s service with the Royal Naval Air Service.

‘There is significant Gallipoli interest, with a number of excellent images of the Gallipoli peninsula.

‘It is rare to get original photos of Gallipoli from an officer and these are previously unseen.

‘A later section illustrates the Armoured Cars Unit in action at Mersa Matrooh, including trenches and prisoners.

‘The album could very easily have been lost forever as it was salvaged in the nick of time from a tip.’

On returning to Britain GG Speight was based as an RNAS Observer in Cornwall. The album, which also shows troops during rare moments of relaxation away from the heat of battle, has emerged for sale with C & T Auctions, of Ashford, Kent

On returning to Britain GG Speight was based as an RNAS Observer in Cornwall. The album, which also shows troops during rare moments of relaxation away from the heat of battle, has emerged for sale with C & T Auctions, of Ashford, Kent

This picture shows the RNAS now a long way from the sea in Upper Egypt. The fascinating snaps were taken by Sub Lieutenant Gilbert Speight who served in the Royal Naval Air Service in World War One

This picture shows the RNAS now a long way from the sea in Upper Egypt. The fascinating snaps were taken by Sub Lieutenant Gilbert Speight who served in the Royal Naval Air Service in World War One

These images show the primitive living conditions during the campaign. A number of troops perished from sickness due to conditions in the camp

These images show the primitive living conditions during the campaign. A number of troops perished from sickness due to conditions in the camp

This image shows soldiers resting behind the lines. The Gallipoli campaign is regarded as one of the Britain's biggest military disasters, with a staggering 44,000 Allied troops killed

This image shows soldiers resting behind the lines. The Gallipoli campaign is regarded as one of the Britain’s biggest military disasters, with a staggering 44,000 Allied troops killed

Various captured trophies from the ignominious Gallipoli campaign, such as a machine gun and Turkish M.G tripod

Various captured trophies from the ignominious Gallipoli campaign, such as a machine gun and Turkish M.G tripod

This page shows the troops recovering in hospital in Alexandria. Never before seen photos of the disastrous Gallipoli campaign have come to light over a century later

This page shows the troops recovering in hospital in Alexandria. Never before seen photos of the disastrous Gallipoli campaign have come to light over a century later

'Certificate of wounds and hurts' - Speight's accident report after a crash whilst he was based as an RNAS Observer in Cornwall

‘Certificate of wounds and hurts’ – Speight’s accident report after a crash whilst he was based as an RNAS Observer in Cornwall

The comprehensive photo album had been dumped at a refuse tip and would have been destroyed. Luckily the vendor picked it up, flicked through it and realised its significance. Sadly little is known of Lt Speight but it is believed he survived for First World War

The comprehensive photo album had been dumped at a refuse tip and would have been destroyed. Luckily the vendor picked it up, flicked through it and realised its significance. Sadly little is known of Lt Speight but it is believed he survived for First World War

This page shows the troops recovering in hospital in Alexandria. More than half perished due to sicknesses such as dysentery caused by the unsanitary environment

This page shows the troops recovering in hospital in Alexandria. More than half perished due to sicknesses such as dysentery caused by the unsanitary environment

The arrival of the RNAS in Gallipoli in April 1915. Never before seen photos of the disastrous Gallipoli campaign have come to light over a century later

The arrival of the RNAS in Gallipoli in April 1915. Never before seen photos of the disastrous Gallipoli campaign have come to light over a century later

A demolished castle at 'Seddul Bahr.' Six Victoria Crosses (VC) awarded to members of the Lancashire Fusiliers for their bravery at Gallipoli during World War One

A demolished castle at ‘Seddul Bahr.’ Six Victoria Crosses (VC) awarded to members of the Lancashire Fusiliers for their bravery at Gallipoli during World War One

The album shows troops from all over the Empire. Photos covering Lt Speight's time in Eygpt focus on actions at Mersa Matrooh in 1916, which would also be the scene of a much larger offensive in World War Two

The album shows troops from all over the Empire. Photos covering Lt Speight’s time in Eygpt focus on actions at Mersa Matrooh in 1916, which would also be the scene of a much larger offensive in World War Two

Funeral of Colonel Snow and 16 other casualties - The little known Senussi campaign of January 1916

Funeral of Colonel Snow and 16 other casualties – The little known Senussi campaign of January 1916

Pictures from around Gallipoli including the graves of French soldiers, a British armoured car in a dug out and a resupply ship

Pictures from around Gallipoli including the graves of French soldiers, a British armoured car in a dug out and a resupply ship

Lt Speight travelled from Malta to Gallipoli in 1915 and was stationed there for the 11 month campaign against the Ottomans, which ran from February 1915 to January 1916.

It is regarded as one of the Britain’s biggest military disasters, with a staggering 44,000 Allied troops killed.

More than half perished due to sicknesses such as dysentery caused by the unsanitary environment.

Photos covering Lt Speight’s time in Eygpt focus on actions at Mersa Matrooh in 1916, which would also be the scene of a much larger offensive in World War Two.

Away from the heat of battle, he can be seen enjoying a ‘tea party’ with fellow soldiers in Alexandria. The sale takes place on Tuesday.

GALLIPOLI LANDINGS: WATERS RAN RED WITH BLOOD

The background to the Gallipoli landings was one of deadlock on the Western Front in 1915, when the British hoped to capture Constantinople.

The Russians were under threat from the Turks in the Caucasus and needed help, so the British decided to bombard and try to capture Gallipoli.

Located on the western coast of the Dardanelles, the British hoped by eventually getting to Constantinople that they would link up with the Russians.

The intention of this was to then knock Turkey out of the war. A naval attack began on February 19 but it was called off after three battleships were sunk.

Then, by the time of another landing on April 25, the Turks had been given time to prepare better fortifications and increased their armies sixfold.

Australian and New Zealand troops won a bridgehead at what became known as Anzac Cove as the British aimed to land at five points in Cape Helles – but only managed three.

The British still required reinforcements in these areas and the Turkish were able to bring extra troops onto the peninsula to better defend themselves.

A standstill continued through the summer in hot and filthy conditions, and the campaign was eventually ended by the War Council in winter 1915/16.

The invasion had been intended to knock Turkey out of the war, but in the end it only gave the Russians some breathing space from the Turks.

Anzac Cove became a focus for Australian pride after forces were stuck there in squalid conditions for eight months, defending the area from the Turks.

The Anzac soldiers who arrived on the narrow strip of beach were faced with a difficult environment of steep cliffs and ridges – and almost daily shelling.

At the height of the fighting during the landings of April 25, 1915, the waters around the peninsula were stained red with blood at one point 150ft out.

Fierce resistance from the under-rated Ottoman forces, inhospitable terrain and bungled planning spelt disaster for the campaign.

Six Victoria Crosses (VC) awarded to members of the Lancashire Fusiliers for their bravery at Gallipoli during World War One are set to be displayed together for the first time next year to commemorate 100 years since the famous victory.

Collectively the medals became known as the ‘six VCs before breakfast’ after they were awarded in recognition of the gallantry and bravery shown by the men of the 1st Battalion while many in Britain were still asleep. 



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